Posts Tagged ‘AC/DC’

165194-L-LOIf you need a reminder of why Australian rock n roll of the 1970 and 80s was the best in the world – then ‘The Glory Days Of Aussie Pub Rock’ is for you. Festival Records have done a superb job in capturing the best bands of that period, with a whopping 4 CD, 90 song set that has something for everyone. The obvious guitar heavyweights of the pub rock period are represented – with songs by Cold Chisel, The Angels, Divinyls and Rose Tattoo – yet what makes this comp a standout from others, is that the good folks at Festival have given some thought and insight when putting the project together. For example: Unlike other previous comps, where the ‘obvious’ hit was the choice to represent the band – on this CD, it’s not the case. The Angels tune is not the somewhat tired sounding ‘Am I Ever Gonna See Your Face Again’, but the Birdman influenced ‘Shadow Boxer’. The Rose Tattoo tune is ‘One Of The Boys’ which probably should have been released as a single. By taking this approach – it means that the CD set will appeal to seasoned punters who were actually there during these halcyon days – as well as those who weren’t. Smart move. The Skyhooks tune is even a non-Shirley tune – with the often overlooked ‘Over The Border’ sounding vital and relevant. Superb, McCainsh lyrical wit as you’d expect.

 It’s good to hear pub rock stalwarts The Radiators, a band that probably should have had success overseas in the early 80s, as well as Spy V Spy – both bands I saw in countless Sydney pubs in the 1980s.  My favourite Spy’s tune is ‘Sally Ann’, but ‘Hard Times’ reminds you why this band were pub rock kingpins in the mid 80s. Rose Tattoo’s Pete Wells ‘Between The Saddle and The Ground’ is one of the other highlights. Plaintive, Dylanesqe vocal delivery – outlaw country – melodic, memorable riff – a tune that should have been bigger that what it was.

 It’s good that the OL’55 tune is ‘C’mon Let’s Do It’ and not the go-to tune ‘On The Prowl’.  Ol ’55 had a lot more going on musically than just being a revival outfit, and this tune reminds you of that. Ol 55’s key songwriter Jim Manzie had a lot of pop sensibility, and once free of the restrictions of being in a 50’s revival band, (both a blessing and a curse no doubt ), he began to really explore his pop song writing chops. His work with post OL ’55 outfits The Breakers and The Fives is often overlooked. The long out of print Breakers tune ‘When I’m On TV’ is included on this comp and it sounds great. Superb hard edge pop with a stack of melody and catchy chorus.  Almost worth the price of the CD for that tune alone! Who else remembers seeing this on Countdown?

From the early 70s period that are tunes by Buster Brown, Jim Keays, Thorpie, Daddy Cool, and Fraternity.  From the mid 70s there are tunes by Taste, Hush, Dallimore and Supernaut (with one of their brilliant post punk tunes ‘Unemployed’). TMG are also here too with ‘Gonna Be Somebody’, a disregarded hard rocking single lifted off their 1978 ‘Disturbing The Peace’ album. This tune sounds killer – given the digital treatment. From the 1980s – there is more great Oz pub rock fare with the Baby Animals, Screaming Jets, Kings Of The Sun, Noiseworks, Nick Barker, Hoodoo Gurus, The Church and the Saints. There are so many great bands here – you’d be hard pressed not to find something to your liking. There’s also Kevin Borich, Stars, Richard Clapton, Moving Pictures, the Hitmen, Dingoes, the Ferrets and the Sports.

Painters & Dockers get a guernsey with ‘Die Yuppie Die’ whilst the Flowers tune ‘Sister’ is a good alternate choice to ‘We Can Get Together’.  I forgot how good Heroes were, and ‘I Can’t Go On’ sounds fresh. Who else remembers The Motivators, The Aliens, Flaming Hands, Young Modern and the Johnnys? That’s right – they are also represented here.

Whilst Russell Morris is getting all the accolades (justly so) for his recent blues albums, people often forget his great work in the late 70s / early 80s. My favourite album is ‘Foot In The Door’ and how can you go past ‘Running Jumping Standing Still’ as an example of an iconic tune – Australian or otherwise? This CD contains one of his tunes with The Rubes, ‘Walk Don’t Run’, which is melodic and catchy hard edged pop from a guy who has a truckload of great songs to his name. Forget about ‘The Real Thing’ and ‘Wings Of An Eagle’ – dig into his late 70s period!  ‘Walk Don’t Run’ will get your started.  

I hadn’t heard The Spaniards tune ‘I Want To Live In A House’ since I saw Starstruck at the movies back in 1982, and it’s also good to hear Mike Rudd & The Heaters – another guy whose extensive body of musical work post Spectrum/Arial is often overlooked. One of Adelaide’s great pub rock bands The Boys are here with ‘Weoh Weoh Weoh‘, and the fantastic Numbers also with Four Letter Word’. Annalise Morrow certainly had it going on, and The Numbers were just about guitar-pop perfection.

Another pleasant surprise was the female fronted Melbourne outfit The Kevins, whose single ‘Romeo Romeo’ was originally released in 1982 on the White Label. I’d forgotten what a great tune this was and it’s good to hear it unearthed and given a new lease of life. Nice deep that stacks up well against bands with a larger profile.

Mi-Sex were one of the best bands of the pub rock glory days, and ‘Graffiti Crimes’ sounds fantastic to my ears in 2017. In fact Mi-Sex’s music sounds better as time goes on. Testament to the songwriting.  The album winds up with Swanee out front of The Alan Lancaster/John Brewster version of the Party Boys – and ‘High Voltage’ is a nice recap of what I told you at the start – Australian rock n roll is the best there is. 

A couple of surprises on the album were the Cockroaches tune ‘Hey What Now’ which is close to hard rock (on the verses anyway) and a long way from the Anthony Field Wiggles era –and the Warumpi Band’s ‘Stompin Ground’ which is indeed hard rock. Good tune too.

This is not a hastily thrown together comp. Like other recent Festival compilations, (Boogie!, When Sharpies Ruled, Silver Road etc), the bands and songs that represent them have been well considered – with a finished product that serves as a great audio document of a wonderful period of Australian music history. The package contains an excellent booklet with exhaustive liner notes, band info and cool images – including front page covers of many old issues of RAM!

Note that this is volume 2. Volume 1 also contains a monstrous 90 odd tracks and is equally worthy of your attention. Good work Festival. Keep up the good work Dog! 9 out of 10. Available everywhere.   

8521d6_ac1187ffe978438e9609187579ff7d28The sun has almost set on 2016, and one of the highlights of the year has been the reformation of the Ted Mulry Gang (TMG). The fact that TMG are playing out live, 40 years after their halcyon days is quite incredible – and something we should all be thankful for. Not just playing out though – for if you’ve seen them live on any of their handful of dates in the latter part of this year on their ‘This Ones For Ted’ tour – you will be all too aware that live, they are more than delivering the goods – and are killing it as a live unit. If you told me a few years back that TMG would be out and about playing live in 2016 sans Ted, I would have told you, “Not a snowball’s chance in hell, never in a million years”. Yet with Ted’s younger brother Steve Mulry out front – it all makes perfect sense.

I think the last time I saw TMG was at Promises at Sylvania, or somewhere in Sydney’s south in 1995 or 96 supporting Suzi Quatro. I remember thinking that Quatro was boring and TMG blew her away. Twenty years later, TMG are kicking major ass, and are one of the hottest live tickets doing the rounds right now.  Vocalist Steve Mulry  is certainly doing justice to the TMG material, and is singing his absolute heart out. I’m sure Ted is looking down on his brother and old band mates with a smiling nod of approval. Yep – they are more than doing justice to the TMG legacy – and with Steve out front – are adding to it. In fact, after seeing the band a couple of times on this current tour, I can say hand-on-heart that Steve is making the material well and truly his own. With Steve coming from a heavy rock background, TMG in 2016 are tougher sounding, more muscled up, and a tighter rocking unit. Part of that is due also to having rock solid Mark Evans of AC/DC on bass.

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TMG – carving it up at Dee Why RSL 9/12/16 – photo (c) D. Gray

It is short sighted to pigeonhole or stereotype TMG as a ‘Countdown band’ or a band known for only ‘that song’. For some people, I’m sure the revival or nostalgia tag is a reason that gets them along to see the band, yet take my word for it – TMG have a depth and quality to their songs that have seen their material endure incredibly well over time. It’s the aforementioned reason though, (a misguided opinion shared by the mainstream who see the band as a one hit 70s teen band), that has precluded TMG from being inducted into the ARIA Hall Of Fame. It’s an injustice, and no doubt political, as to why TMG have not been inducted into the Hall Of Fame. It would be a just acknowledgement, yet at the end of the day who really cares. Who gives credence to this two-bit, self-serving organisation anyway? As someone who likes to think I know a little bit about rock ‘n’ roll, take my word for it instead when I tell you that TMG have several albums worth of memorable, original, catchy rock that has stood the test of time – and still sound killer. Great melodies, great choruses, great songs. Some of their best material in fact is off their last couple of albums, ‘Disturbing The Peace’ and ‘Locked In’.

Many of Australian biggest bands of the 70’s had a second bite of the cherry in the 90s (including John Paul Young via ‘Strictly Ballroom’ and Skyhooks in 1983 and 1990/91). Those that didn’t have this second run were given their dues as part of the Countdown concerts in the mid 2000s, with bands like Supernaut, Cheetah, Hush and of course Sherbet (arguably the biggest Australian band of the 70’s), reforming with both Clive Shakespeare and Harvey James on guitars. Ted’s passing in 2001 precluded TMG from taking part in the Countdown Concert series.  In the early part of the 90s though, TMG did do a bunch of shows and TV appearances a part of a short lived 70’s revival – including Hey Hey Its Saturday and 70’s themed nights. Yet to me, this early 1990’s revival of the Seventies music and culture, was more about having a swipe at the music and fashion of that period – and was taking the piss out of it. It was ‘daggy’, it was uncool – so that made it cool right?  Which really missed the point.  I dig Australian rock ‘n’ roll – it’s the best in the world. From AC/DC to Rose Tattoo, Skyhooks, The Angels, Screaming Jets, Screaming Tribesmen, Radio Birdman, Easybeats, Saints and all points in between – In my opinion, TMG are one of the best band’s this country has ever produced and in a just world, should have/could have been as big as AC/DC.

Mr Rockbrat and I have a connection with TMG rock n roll that still resonates to this day. I have fond memories of sitting in my brother’s bedroom playing the TMG Greatest Hits LP over and over again. Man, they sounded better than Slade, better than Quo. Listen to those killer riffs. A lot like AC/DC……AND they were a Sydney band, unlike Skyhooks or Taste (in those days friends, there was still a Sydney Melbourne rivalry). They lived in the suburb next to where I grew up. As kids, my brother and I used to see the TMG band truck everywhere (with Ronnie Roadie no doubt at the wheel). They were a hard rocking, hardworking band playing memorable, original hard edged rock n roll. What was not to like?

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Rare West German & US TMG LP’s

Yet let’s get back to the present. Highlights from the current TMG show are many. ‘My Little Girl’ ‘Crazy’ ‘Wanted Man’, ‘Heart Of Stone’, ‘Lazy Eyes’, and ‘I’m Free’ to name a few of the highlights. Les Hall, as well as being one of this country’s most underrated guitar players, also wrote many TMG staples that have gone on to become Oz rock standards – people forget that fact. To see Les spitting out blistering solos in 2016 at stage left is a sight (and sound) to savour.  To hear Gary Dixon run through spot-on acoustic versions of ‘Julia’ and ‘Falling In Love Again’ is another highlight of the show, reminding you just how great these songs are, what an outstanding songwriter Ted was, and what an appealing voice Gary possesses. As guitar players who have had a major impact on Australian rock ‘n’ roll – both Gary Dixon and Les Hall are deserving of way more respect. They are rock ‘n’ roll personified. Drummer Herm Kovac, the backbone of TMG, keeps the beat and hits hard as he always does – Mr Reliable behind the kit. It’s always a joy to see Herm belting out the songs and keeping time. Unrelenting, no frills. The band deliver a ball busting rendition of AC/DC’s ‘It’s a Long Way To The Top’ that sends shivers down your spine. This is as close as you are gonna get to the vintage AC/DC sound- and as I’ve said before, these guys are Australian hard rock royalty – and deserve all the successes and accolades owed to them – more in fact.

TMG have a lineage that is entwined with AC/DC and what became known as the “Albert sound”.  They are the only ‘Alberts Band’ out there today playing with any real conviction.  Consider also that in 2016, other seventies band  like Sherbet, Hush, the original Angels, original Tatts etc will never ever be back – with so many of their key members now having sadly passed on. The starkness that TMG are the ONLY band of this ilk still out there doing it – and doing it bloody well, cannot be understated. When I saw TMG last weekend, Angry Anderson got up and belted out ‘Bad Boy For Love’ as an encore. Does it get any cooler than that in 2016? I think not. Rock fans in Europe would kill to see this kind of event. (Way more needs to be done in Australia to honour the legacy of Australia’s great hard rock bands from the 70s, bands that are revered overseas. There exists an ambivalence amongst the music industry, Government’s and the population at large towards bands from this era of Oz rock. Melbourne has AC/DC Lane? And Sydney ? The HOME of AC/DC and the Young’s. Why is Chequers a Chinese owned massage parlour? Why can’t Chequers revert to a rock venue akin to Melbourne ‘Cherry Bar?  Where is the statue to Thorpie? To Tattoo’s legacy? The attitude, the apathy at large is pretty apparent. Yet I’ve digressed. These are issues for another time).

TMG in 2016 are one lean, hard rocking band firing on all cylinders – playing material from the 1970s that sounds relevant and vital, and one can only hope that this recharged line up of TMG enter the studio to release some new material. TMG in 2016 is not revivalism. This is not nostalgia. This is a kick ass rock ‘n’ roll band – the last of their kind. Get out there and see them whilst you can.  If you only see one show in 2017 –make it TMG. Satisfaction guaranteed.  Go to the band’s web site for details of upcoming shows in 2017.

Check out Episode 62 of the Australian Rock Show – An interview with Steve Mulry, Rick Lum from Hush and TMG fans conducted at the Ted Mulry Memorial Day 3/9/16 here

Check out Episode 42 of the Australian Rock Show – An interview with Ronald Clayton  – TMG’s long time roadie (you can meet Ronnie at any of the current TMG shows at the merch table). Listen here

Rockbrat Wonders – Why TMG Are not in the ARIA Hall Of Fame

ARS58_largeOn episode 58 of The Australian Rock Show we crank hot n heavy new tunage from Airbourne and get blown sky high with some classic AC/DC. Scott Ginn (ex-Boss) has re-mastered and re-issued his ‘One Man Army’ album from 1986 – which also cops an airing, as does his late 80’s outfit Rags n Riches. We crank the new 45 from The Iceman – Deniz Tek and also check out the newie from Johnny Kannis – which has guest vox from Jimmy Barnes. We pay tribute to Steve Crofts, look over upcoming gig dates, share the rock news and much much more. Play loud ! LISTEN or download HERE!

Music by: Airbourne, AC/DC, Scott Ginn, Rags n Riches, T.M.G, Owen Campbell, Deniz Tek, Johnny Kannis, The Bombers

Whilst I’m in an AC/DC mood – and why wouldn’t you not be, I thought I’d delve a little deeper into the Young family tree and pen a few words about two relatives of the famous Young brothers – being nephew Stevie Young. This is particularly relevant to yesterday’s post on Alex Young, as Stevie is Alex’s son. During the 1988 U.S. tour for AC/DC’s album Blow Up Your Video, (which started on May 3, 1988)  Stevie famously filled in for Malcolm on rhythm guitar, while Malcolm was off addressing his issues with the bottle. Apparently, many fans were not even aware that Malcolm had been replaced, as Stevie bore a close physical resemblance to him. His first show with AC/DC was at Portland, Oregon on May 3, 1988, and he was essentially with the band from May to November 1988. Stevie grew up in the Scottish town of Hawick, and by the late 70s, was in his first bands, The Stabbers, Prowler and Tantrum – yet it is with The Starfighters that he his most well-known. The Starfighters made two albums, the self titled effort in 1981, and the second album ‘In Flight Movie’ that came out in 1983. Both were released on Jive Records. Starfighters also played several support shows on AC/DC’s Back in Black UK Tour in 1980. The band split in 1983 before reforming again in 1987 for another shot at the big time. After Stevie’s stint playing Malcolm,  he formed Little Big Horn, whose demo tape was produced by Malcolm Young. They soon broke up after a lack of success in signing a record deal, although not before they had recorded a session for Tommy Vance’s Friday Rock Show on BBC Radio 1. Stevie later formed Up Rising, again, with limited success. Anyway, several bootlegs exist from his time with AC/DC on that North American Tour, and it goes without saying that both Starfighters albums are essential AC/DC styled albums. I used to have an album by Sydney’s BB Steal (ex Boss) called ‘On The Edge’ that featured James Young on drums (he also later went on to be in The Poor – who in turn supported AC/DC in 96). Not sure if he was related to the famous Young clan though. Anyway here is the video for their tune ‘ Hot Shot’ (sorry – no videos of the band I can find)

 

 

Amongst four Young brothers (and one sister Margaret), its well-known that three of those brothers went on to phenomenal music careers. Easybeat George, Malcolm and Angus to AC/DC (obviously) – but what do you know about the other brother, the one that stayed behind in Scotland, Alexander Young ?  The Young’s parents, William (1911–85) and Margaret (1913–88), emigrated from the Cranhill area of Glasgow, Scotland, to Sydney, Australia, in May 1963 with their children George, Margaret, Malcolm, and Angus  (eventually settling in the suburb of Burwood where Malcolm and Angus attended Ashfield Boys High School). When The Young family emigrated in 1963, Alexander would have been 25 years of age, 8 years older than George, 15 years senior to Malcolm and 17 years older than Angus. He chose to remain in Britain to pursue musical interests. Can’t help but wonder whether he would have had success with George as part of The Easybeats. Anyway, as time showed he took a different path – and counted the Beatles as his peers. In the early 60’s he was in a band called the Bobby Patrick Big Six and spent some time touring in Germany, before forming the band he became most famous for – Grapefruit. In 1967, at 29 years of age, Alexander was playing bass in the London based outfit, who also included three former members of Tony Rivers and the Castaways. Young was signed as songwriter with Apple Music Publishing Ltd. by Terry Doran, managing director of Apple, (friend of the Beatles and Lennon in particular), and later manager of Grapefruit, during the summer of 1967. The song writing contract was based on the strength of the song “Lullaby for a Lazy Day”, which John Lennon liked (he and McCartney also produced it). A tape with this song was found in Lennon’s personal belongings after his death. The song was originally called “Sgt. Pepper Circus”. Released on Apple , it sounds very trippy and very much of its period – with lyrics about dreaming and colours – its 67 era LSD fare. Grapefruit were named by John Lennon after his future wife, Yoko Ono’s book ‘Grapefruit’. Terry Doran saw some commercial potential in them. It certainly helped having heavyweights like the Beatles pushing your wagon – as Grapefruit received much support from The Beatles from 68- 69. The group was launched by the Beatles with a press conference in 1968, on 17 January, with the first single “Dear Delilah”.  As well as Lennon, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr, Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones, Donovan, and Cilla Black attended the press launch and all were photographed with the band. Jimi Hendrix was also reportedly also in attendance. Grapefruit were also, apparently, part of the Hey Jude Recording sessions.  Interestingly, Grapefruit were also signed to a US label Equinox, run by Terry Melcher, who had produced ‘Dear Delilah’. That song went on to be their most well-known, and most successful. It went to number 21 in the UK single chart in February 1968. Paul McCartney directed a promo film (never released) for the single “Elevator”.  John Lennon, Paul McCartney and George Harrison attended and helped in their recording sessions for the singles, as Grapefruit didn’t have a producer at the time.  As evidenced by all this support –  the Beatles must have been fairly confident that Grapefruit were headed for bigger things and no doubt thought that crossing Apple and Grapefruit spelt dollars and not fruit salad. However, after only two years, the group broke up in late 1969, leaving a handful of singles and two albums, Around Grapefruit (1968) and Deep Water (1969). The hard rocking “Deep Water” did crack the German Top 20, peaking at No. 19. Toward the end of their career, following the new material being written by Alexander, Grapefruit shifted from melodic pop to more of a rock-based sound. In 1969 Alexander joined forces with his brother, George Young, and his Easybeats partner Harry Vanda and, in 1970, they recorded for the Young Blood label as Paintbox and Tramp. He also participated in sessions for Vanda and Young’s Marcus Hook Roll Band. Alexander, along with George Young and Harry Vanda, revived the Grapefruit name in 1971 issuing, “Universal Party” / “Sha Sha”, but the reunion was short-lived. (Check out the catchy ‘Universal Party’ here). A song written by Alex Young,  “I’m a Rebel”, was recorded in 1976 by AC/DC but was never released. The song remains in Albert Productions vaults, being almost impossible to find (not included in ‘rare track’ box sets either). The song was later covered by Accept in 1979 for their 2nd album, 1980s ‘Im A Rebel’ , and is apparently, very close sounding to the original. Accept guitarist Wolf Hoffmann recalled the circumstances that led Alex Young to work with Accept: “He got involved with Accept through the producer, Dieter Dirks. Everybody after the first record said we have to have a radio hit. ‘Guys,  you need a radio hit and we have just the song for you. Why don’t you try this here?'”  If you think how good it sounds with Udo, one can only imagine how great it sounds with Bon on vocals. From 1995 till August 1997, Alex Young worked as a music manager with “Proud and Loud Management”, based in Hamburg. He sadly died of lung cancer in Hamburg-Sasel on 4 August 1997.  Go check out some of Alex Young’s music – and remember that the senior Young brother also made killer rock n roll, particularly if you dig stuff from the mid to late 60s, like the Easybeats / Small Faces etc.  Both Grapefruit albums (as well as a BBC Sessions CD) are available on CD here. What an amazingly talented set of brothers.     

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Who needed high school when we had material like this to learn from

I recently unearthed this item and man it floored me. Like being introduced to an old friend you haven’t seen in years. ‘Heavy’ was something special to me and the Cowboy. You see my rock n roll sibling owned this and we all but wore it out. Back then our rock n roll brains were sponges, eager to soak up and learn what we could. Rock knowledge was gained from print press, friends or by listening to compilation’s like this. No internet in back ’83 egg-heads, remember that. So this indeed was a vital part of our rock n roll education and we learnt a lot from it. Maiden’s Number of The Beast we knew well – but it is always a great album opener. How can anyone not dig Maiden ? Their songs still smoke most bands of today and their tunage will always sounds vital and fresh. If you skip over Iron Maiden on your  iPad or similar, you need to get into their back-catalogue. Having Purple follow them up is like switching from a 1000CC to a Vespa. At least it wasn’t Black Night. Followers of fossil-rock may disagree all they want – but this worn out plodder should be banished from hard rock compilations forever. They all came out to Montreux a freakin’ long time ago and shoulda f**kin’ stayed there.  Ditto with Sabbath’s Paranoid…finished with my woman ’cause she couldn’t help me BANG !!! Enough already. By 1982 this thing had not aged well….  god forbid how it sounds now. Sabbath with Ozzy recently toured here but it barely made the news – my how times have changed. Heaven, the Rosie Tatts and Southern Cross flew the Aussie flag and helped to point us in the right direction. Southern Cross were ex-Buffalo and it makes me wonder how a track released in 76 ended up on this thing six years later !? Mix in some Quo, Van Halen and even Bonnet-era Rainbow ! Great. Including two Crapton toons at the end really was dropping the ball on this project, but thinking back, we hovered over these style-lifters back then, quick to figure out how boring ol’ Slowhand really was. Clouds. Anyway, this is a snap shot of an album which helped ensure we stayed on the path of cool rock n roll.  10 out of 10 Mr Gold Air

ImageFrom memory, I purchased this around 85 and it rules. Double LP, gate-fold sleeve, pressed locally via Concept Records. Around this time period, heavy metal was all I knew. Money earnt from my menial factory job was spent on metal records….and I’ve never regretted it. Actually this compilation really is a sneak peek at the barren musical landscape that was Australia in the mid-80’s. Hard rock and heavy metal was indeed – underground. Mr Rockbrat laughs when, nowadays, you run into people – straights, who tell you they went and saw Slayer on the weekend, or they have the new Sabbath CD ! Alas, metal maniacs, it was not always like this. Anyway, I found this gem whilst rummaging through my wax recently and as I cast my eyes over it, it got me thinking how much I learnt from it. Who needed school text books when the ‘istory of ‘eavy metal had to be learned, right ?!  The collection is pretty much a snap-shot of 83-84 heavy metal releases. WASP, AC/DC, Quiet Riot, Scorps, Sabbath, Twisted Sister, Ozzy, Motorhead, Dio, Motley, Priest, Kiss – big guns of the genre at that time, who all have tracks on here. But it was the inclusion of bands like Warlock, Y & T, Titan and Coney Hatch which had me in a spin. Often, the first place you would hear new bands was on compilations, and such was the case with Metal Madness. The Rock Goddess tune ‘Hell Hath No Fury’ – tuned me on to this kick-ass chick three-piece and I still listen to them today. Girlschool got a start – as did Lita Ford ! A rickapoodie and a fandooglie !  The Sabbath tune ‘Trashed’ was with Gillan up front – it confirms what I said before that the comp in fact pieced together some of the most recent releases from this time period (never could stomach Ian Gillan’s shrilling vocals). Points to the compiler – Grand Wizard Glenn A Baker – for doing that. The inclusion of local acts Titan, Boss and Melbourne’s Bengal Tigers showed Baker – or an assistant, had their ear to the ground, but the inclusion of Spinal Tap was not funny – or was it ? Is this a joke ? Is this a joke ? How the hell did Canned Heat get a look in ? Including the Kiss plodder ‘Get All You Can Take’ from their then-released Animalize opus, was a masterstroke in absurdity. ‘Heaven’s On Fire’ or ‘Thrills In The Night’ woulda been my Kiss cuts from that rekkid – but it mattered not. Adelaide’s Titan, as you may or may not know, released ‘Head Scare’ on Raven Records. I think some of those members ended up in Almost Human, did they not ? This release was followed-up by the equally rockin’ ‘Headbanger’s Heaven’ double LP a short while later. Again, the record introduced me to some great HM bands, many of which still get spun on the rockbrat turntable. As the wacky Baker states in the liner notes ‘ if you can’t get off on this brain-bending compilation, you’re beyond all hope’. Comments from the Super Coach.