Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Episode 69 – Bruce Kulick Interview

Posted: April 27, 2017 by rockbrat in Uncategorized

Former Kiss guitarist Bruce Kulick returns to Australia soon for a run of dates in May. Kulick’s musical journey has seen him do time with Blackjack, Meatloaf, The Good Rats, Billy Squier, Michael Bolton, Kiss, Grand Funk Railroad and many others. On episide 69 of The Australian Rock Show we chat with Bruce about his time in Kiss, his upcoming tour downunder and lots more ! Play this one loud ? right between the eyes !

Music by:

Bruce Kulick, The Sharp, Blackjack 

Check out this episode!

Episode 67 – Clifford Hoad Interview

Posted: April 15, 2017 by rockbrat in Uncategorized

On episode 67 of The Australian Rock Show we chat with Clifford Hoad – founder of the mighty Kings Of The Sun. We talk about their recently released ‘Razed On Rock’ album, and also their upcoming ‘Playin’ To the Heavens’ record. Cliff has rock n roll pulsing through his veins and this is an interview you don’t wanna miss. Tune in and play loud !

Music by:

Kings Of The Sun, Deep Purple

Check out this episode!

The Rockbrat Blog

rollercoasterWell, I’m gonna go out on a limb here – but I’m confident. We are only a quarter into the year – and already, the albums of the year have arrived. Makes little difference what comes out in the next 8 months, I’m here to tell you that nothing released this year will surpass the two new albums from Georgia’s finest – the great Dan Baird. For Dan Baird fans – Christmas has indeed come early. He has released not one – but TWO new albums, and both are exceptional.

Baird has released many albums since the Satellites demise, commencing with his first album in 1992, ‘Love Songs For The Hearing Impaired’. ‘Buffalo Nickel’ was good, (LOVE ‘Cumberland River’), as was ‘Out Of Mothballs’, and the material he released with Yayhoos is also exceptional, yet the albums he has released with Homemade Sin have taken him to a whole new…

View original post 1,020 more words

masuak2Chris ‘Klondike’ Masuak needs no introduction. Over the last two decades he has been a crucial member of some of the coolest, most rockin’ bands this country has ever produced. Radio Birdman, The Hitmen, The New Christs, The Screaming Tribesmen, The Juke Savages. Guitarist, singer, songwriter, producer. Australian rock n roll owes a large debt to Chris Masuak. This issue, Vicious Kitten speaks to the man himself, and gets the lowdown on everything from the recent re-flight of Radio Birdman, his views on today’s music scene and also his forthcoming plans……..read on cats !

..


Vicious Kitten: Klondike, let’s talk about the recent Radio Birdman reformation.  How did that all come about ?
Chris Masuak: Radio Birdman used to kick out major horsepower. That kind of energy is hard to contain, and when it spilled into our personal lives we didn’t have the skills to deal with it. Subsequently, it’s taken a lot of years to recover from the fallout and for some of us to even talk to each other. When we found ourselves in a recording studio remixing the old albums the feeling was generous, familiar, and comfortable. Then when I was visiting Deniz in the USA last year, a fax from the Big Day Out boys came through. We kind of looked at each other in a vague inquiring way and I guess decided then and there that if it was OK with the other guys it was fine with us. When Ron jammed with Deniz on one of Deniz’ European tours the die was cast. We all had different reasons for wanting the thing to work. I felt that it was a rare opportunity to repair an ugly ending and make the ‘family’ live happily ever after.

VK: From a fan’s perspective it appeared that the old ‘magic’ was still there. How did it feel to play as a unit after such a long time ? Was the old ‘magic’ still there ?
CM: It was awkward at first. The unreality of the situation was overwhelming ! I had to relearn the songs in some cases but it didn’t really seem to gel. Then one day in rehearsal I remembered the feeling, the posture. Genetic memory kicked in and we were back as far as I was concerned. I’m greatly relieved that we were so appreciated. I guess it means the ‘juju’ is still with us.

VK: Do you have a favourite show from that re-union tour? You looked particularly floored by the raucous response from the Selina’s crowd.
CM: It was typical Birdman; erratic, unpredictable, but always a trip. Yeah, sometimes the response surprised me. It was a case of being shocked out of concentration by the unbelievable support of the fans. I loved playing outdoors. There’s something about the sound and feel of megawatts.

VK: It must have been a thrill to have Wayne Kramer fly out and open the shows. 
CM: Wayne is a huge influence and a magnificent artist. It was an honour to share the same bill with him, Brock and Paul.

VK: Did any special moments/funny incidents occur during the re-union tour ?
CM: The most hilarious thing is that on any given night there were six old farts up on stage and no one got egged. The sight of Ron sitting behind the kit, like a cross between Buddha and Winnie the Pooh was worth the price of admission.

VK: Will Birdman be releasing any new product ?
CM: It’s possible.

VK: Was the reformation tour a one off ? There are a few rumours of a European tour ?
CM: We’ve all got our own projects and obligations, and we live all over the planet. The last tour was a logistical nightmare and it’s success was testament to John Needham, our manager’s courage and patience. I didn’t believe anything about the last tour until I had the proof in my hands, so who knows.

VK: The last re-incarnation of The Hitmen spawned the wonderful ‘Moronic Inferno’ LP. Your playing on that record is just so fluent. Were you disappointed with the lack of response it received from the music press and the record buying public in general ?
CM: Yeah, The Hitmen kinda fizzled out. We never did get much support from the industry here, and in fact even Triple J usually reject any of my stuff as “not the kind of music they play on this station”. Still, I can’t complain. I got more second chances in twenty odd years of rockin’ than most people dream of.

VK: Whilst on The Hitmen, I find it hard to believe that the indestructible Johnny Kannis is not on a stage somewhere. What is Zeus up to nowadays ?
CM: Johnny’s up north where it’s warm doing entrepreneurial stuff. His injuries really do keep him from doing much, which I know is a frustration.

VK: Let’s talk about your time with The Screaming Tribesmen – in particular the US tour of 1987. How did that go, and was the band well received ?
CM: We had support up the yinyang but basically fell apart at the seams. The performances were too erratic for me to accept and we all had personal problems to deal with and the band blew it. It’s always seemed a shame that Mick didn’t take advantage of all the resources and keep going in that direction. He had it all on a plate at that time – despite the problems and with his talent and a bit of vision, may have kept the hits coming. The fans were certainly there for it.

VK: Johnny Kannis and yourself received a ‘thankyou’ on the Manitoba’s Wild Kingdom album ‘…And You ?’, whilst the latter day Hitmen used to open up with ‘The Party Starts Now’. What is the connection there ?
CM: We met the Handsome One in New York, and he came onstage for a Dictators encore at The Cat Club. The next thing you know Andy Shernoff has invited me to play on ‘The Party Starts Now’. There’s this guy in the studio and Andy says “Chris, meet Ross”. Dumb fuck that I am, I go “The Boss ??!!”. I spent much of my career ripping him off. Perhaps the style was too close to the bone ’cause they didn’t end up using my leadbreak (which I consider superior). Kannis and I hung out with them for a while and it was a pleasant surprise to be acknowledged on their album.

VK: What have you been up to of late ? You have a new band – The Raouls, is that correct ?
CM: I live, study and work in Sydney and am preparing for fatherhood. I drum in The Raouls which is primarily Warwick Gilbert’s baby and an outlet for his formidable guitar lust. We have recorded songs for a Spanish label and are putting together a CD for release here. We seem to play regularly so I guess there are a few people left in Sydney who don’t have their heads stuck up their ass too far to have fun.

VK: Are The Juke Savages on hold ? What’s in the pipeline ?
CM: The Juke Savages still exist, with a new drummer, Tubby Wadsworth, who despite the stigma of playing with the Candy Harlots (actually, a good bunch of guys) has given us a shot in the arm. We’re recording for a European release and, hopefully, a tour early next year. We don’t play around much; we’re too rocky for the blues fraternity and too bluesy for the hip venues. Too loud, too old, whatever. We’re patient.

VK: What’s your opinion on today’s scene, with the likes of Oasis fairly dominant ? Doesn’t seem to be too much rock-action out there, you really have to search for it nowadays.
CM: I wouldn’t know what’s out there, particularly. There does seem to be a trend toward pop and cohesive arrangements, which would be great if the new artists would come up with some ideas of their own from time to time.

VK: What excites you musically these days ?
CM: Listening to The Raouls, Juke Savages, Wayne Kramer, Coltrane, Parker. Playing the drums and giving up trying to play guitar at a respectable volume.

VK: How did you get into rock n roll ?
CM: My Dad gave me a guitar at 13.

VK: What was the first record you ever bought ?
CM: My brother and I bought Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.

VK: What was the first concert you attended ?
CM: I can’t remember if it was T.Rex or B.B King. T.Rex was crap on every level and I was naive enough to believe that B.B was really collapsing from exertion on stage. I used to go and see these big concerts and heckle bands like Blackfeather, Finch and Hush. Utter crap but no alternative. When I started going to Birdman gigs my academic career was shot to shit and my destiny forged, for better or worse.

VK: Name your five ‘desert island discs’ ?
CM: ‘Cha Cha Cha’ by Bobby Rydell, ‘Linda Sue Dixon’ by Mitch Ryder, ‘Strange Pleasure’ by Jimmie Vaughan, ‘Giant Steps’ by John Coltrane and ‘The Hard Stuff’ by Wayne Kramer.

VK: A message for the Vicious Kitten readers/Klondike fans out there……..
CM: We are all here for a purpose, which I don’t pretend to know. I do know that once we get off our asses and do things, anything, anytime, and lots of it, life gets really weird and interesting and I suspect we get closer to finding out what that purpose may be. Work hard. Play hard. Have fun for cryin’ out loud !

(Archive Source: Vicious Kitten Fanzine Issue 4: July 1996)

On episode 66 of The Australian Rock Show we catch up with original AC/DC vocalist Dave Evans, who gives us the rundown on his recent EP titled ‘Wild’ ? which was recorded with Norwegian hard rockers Barbed Wire. Jeff Hoad from The Rich and Famous also checks in to talk about his new release with The Rich and Famous. Rock news, gig dates, reviews, rants and more ! (Call the Comment Line 0478450747)

Music by:

Dave Evans & Barbed Wire, The Rich and Famous, Choirboys

Check out this episode!

hqdefault

Nerd is the word …..

Are Talking Heads the most overrated band of all time ? They are certainly up there. I never understood Talking Heads. They were a band whom never spoke to me – and as a consequence, were a band I never had any time for. Nerds. Art school nerds. History as shown that they came up as part of the NYC punk scene and were a CBGB’s band – but they weren’t a Ramones/Dead Boys/Blondie CB’s band – no leather jackets and ripped jeans rock ‘n’ roll – Polo shirts and tucked in jeans – they were art school geeks with quirky lyrics, thinking music for listeners with Asperger’s – Arty farty crap. Nerd Rock. They came up through the punk period – but they weren’t a punk band. Art punk ? Punk bands of that period were bands like The Boys, The Lurkers, The Damned. Whenever I bought a punk compilation LP and Talking Heads were on it, I skipped the track.  Its arguable that had they come up as part of the UK punk scene, they would not have made it. According to Wikepedia, “Talking Heads helped to pioneer new wave music by integrating elements of punk, art rock, dance, pop and world music with avant-garde sensibilities and an anxious, clean-cut image.” Really? Who wrote that dross?  Their breakthrough song – “Psycho Killer”, was so at odds with everything else being released by their peers. Byrne’s annoying screech on the chorus ‘Run Run Away, I , I , I , ay” – is painful to listen through. I read a review once that called him a ‘Genius’? Genius ? Hardly. Even Byrne himself said in recent years that he was borderline Aspergers. Looking back, that’s pretty apparent. Which is neither good nor bad – just how it is, and not a

600x600

The result of consulting Liberace for costume ideas…….ghastly.

criticism or judgment. A big deal was made of the fact that they had a female bass player – they became known for that. Who cares ? I think she originally was only in the band cos she was the girlfriend of David Byrne, she couldn’t play bass. Apparently, Byrne “unable to find a bass player in New York”, persuaded her to learn the bass. David Byrne was a complete nerd. He must have been intimated by his peers of that time – Joey Ramone, Stiv, Debbie Harry and the like. He had an awkward style, dressed like a nerd, and was geek personified. That they became big in the mid 80s was odd to me. Stop Making Sense? Not if they were the other option. Baggy suits, burning down the house. Just shows you what a shit time this was for music. As the late 70s and mid 80s rolled through, Talking Heads were all about African beats / disco funk. Ugh. In the mid 80s you couldn’t turn on MTV without having that Stop Making Sense nonsense forced down your throat. Songs like “And She Was” and “Wild Wild Life, ‘Burning Down The House’, were irritatingly given unnecessary exposure – and subsequently became hits – yet this was a time when the charts were filled with this kind of nonsense. Whenever I hear ‘Like Humans Do” or “Once in a lifetime”, I feel like puking. Looking back, that the band had major international success was an anomaly to me. They must have been tedious to see live. That David Byrne has had a sustained career and enjoyed an international profile doesn’t say much for peoples tastes. Same reason why people bought records by Simply Red or Phil Collins records I guess. Passé. That Talking Heads are also in the banal ‘Rock n Roll Hall Of Fame” says more about what a redundant organisation that truly is. Kudos to Steve Miller for calling them out for what they truly are. I’d love to know if others think I’m being somewhat harsh here. Prove me wrong! Maybe there are other overrated bands Ive missed……..

Episode 65 – L7 Interview

Posted: September 30, 2016 by rockbrat in Uncategorized

The mighty L7 – re-united and re-ignited hit Australia soon for a run of shows around the country.  On episode 65 of The Australian Rock Show we chat with Donita Sparks about the re-union, her memories of previous Aussie tours and much more ! Turn this one up loud !

Music by:

L7, Cosmic Psychos

Check out this episode!